Motor Mount

November 15, 2014  Hours spent building to date:  338

Motor mount is in!

Motor mount is in!

 

The engine mount is attached to two more heavy stringers that run about five feet in from the transom and form the sides of the motor well.  They are 3/4-inch plywood, so the well assembly is 1 1/2-inches thick — pretty hefty to handle the two-inch thick mount.

Fitting and measuring the mount by holding it above my head while standing on my tip-toes wasn’t going to happen, so I wrapped a couple cleats in packing tape to make “ramps”  at the correct angle, so I could slide the mount up into the boat and clamp it into place while making adjustments.  Then, considering I had about $100 worth of plywood and epoxy invested in the blank for the mount, I made a plywood template by tracing around the well sides, stringers and keel.  It fit right the first time, so I traced it onto the blank, and cut out the mount — very slow going through a two-inch lamination.

Ray came over to help me slide the mount up into the boat, while I handled the mount and its insurance policy — 316-stainless steel lag screws running through the well sides and two inches into the mount.  I really trust epoxy, but not having the motor mount shake loose and put the engine in the drink will be worth (I hope) the jewelry-level price that West Marine charges for these things.

Then it was back to fairing to get the mount and engine sides perfect angled to accept the planking.  I am really tired of fairing, and with a two-inch lamination to bring down, I decided to exercise the nuclear option of stock removal — a disc grinder with a wheel meant for metal.  This tool will really carve through wood, but is so aggressive that it can really get away from you.  I was grinding away on a thick piece of oak on the Jericho Bay skiff  one day, when I lost my concentration for five seconds and was suddenly half-way through the planking.  But I was extra-careful and finally, FINALLY the back half of the Tardis is as fair as it is going to get.

Short week, since I went with Molly on a business trip to Boston to check out the USS Constitution before she goes into dry dock for three years.  To a wooden boat nut, Old Ironsides is a combination of Chartres, the Blue Mosque and the Taj Mahal, so I want to follow the project closely whenever I can get up to Charlestown.

 

Ramps for the motor mount

Ramps for the motor mount

Motor mount template

Motor mount template

Motor mount dry fit

Motor mount dry fit

Insurance

Insurance

Motor mount faired in

Motor mount faired in

Aft end of the boat is ready for planks

Aft end of the boat is ready for planks

Masts coming out.  This is not how they id it in 1797.

Masts coming out. This is not how they id it in 1797.

Old Ironsides

Old Ironsides

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: