Hot Work

August 3, 2015  Hours spent building to date:  1,258

In high school chemistry, I could never remember the difference between an exothermic reaction (gives off heat) and an endothermic (absorbs heat).  It was the only question I missed on the final, and Mr. Krumholtz was aghast that I would miss such and easy one after three years of Latin.

But 47 years later, holding an epoxy-soaked piece of biaxial fiberglass in my hands with the heat blasting through my rubber gloves, I knew I had an exo going.  Day after day of 90-degree temperatures have made working with epoxy very tricky, since it is extremely sensitive to heat.  The shop tops off at about 81, but even then I have to work fast in very small batches.  Nevertheless, bonding continues, and I moved almost everything off the boat today to get at the last pieces under the walkways.  I’ve been filling in bonding sessions with carpentry, but all those projects are in too early a stage for pictures.

In my other job as volunteer coordinator of old-boat-stuff at the Connecticut River Museum, we had a big weekend, launching the reproduction Connecticut River shad boat Alva Starr.  The Alva was donated to us last winter, and we have been sprucing her up ever since.

A boat name such as Alva Starr, which reeks of New England,  conjures up images of someone’s great-great aunt who navigated the family clipper ship home after Uncle was eaten by cannibals in the South Seas.  Our benefactor notes, however, that he actually named the boat after his favorite movie “This Property Is Condemned” starring Natalie Wood as the heroine Alva Starr.  The images below will show that the name is entirely appropriate.

Bonding looking aft

Bonding looking aft

Bonding looking forward

Bonding looking forward

Alva Starr launched -- not an easy row in a heavy boat

Alva Starr launched — not an easy row in a heavy boat

Alva Starr -- beautiful curves, great lines

Alva Starr — beautiful curves, great lines

Alva's namesake -- beautiful curves, great lines

Alva’s namesake — beautiful curves, great lines

Advertisements

One comment on “Hot Work

  1. Pat
    August 3, 2015 at 9:25 pm #

    Paul,
    I see only irony today. The boat floats. Natalie didn’t.
    PBH

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: